Weak government, strong parliament? A preview of Theresa May’s legislative challenges

Weak government, strong parliament? A preview of Theresa May’s legislative challenges

Being the first without a majority in the Commons or the Lords for 40 years, how will Theresa May’s minority government implement any part of their legislative agenda? How will committees function? Will the smaller parties in the Commons work together? In a blog originally posted on LSE British Politics and Policy, PSA Parliament exec members Marc Geddes, Alexandra Meakin, and Louise Thompson offer a preview of how the 2017 Parliament may function.

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Sunday Trading and the Limits of EVEL

Sunday Trading and the Limits of EVEL

Please note that this piece was originally posted on the UCL Constitution Unit blog, and is available here.

By Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny

Yesterday MPs defeated the government by 317 votes to 286 on its proposals to relax Sunday trading rules. But although the policy would have applied only in England and Wales, the votes of Scottish MPs proved decisive. In this post Daniel Gover and Michael Kenny discuss the territorial dimensions to this episode, and why the recent ‘English Votes for English Laws’ reform did not help the government to pass its legislation.

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Clapping, as a cure for impotence

Clapping, as a cure for impotence

Please note that this blog piece was originally published on the Revolts website, and is available here.

By Philip Cowley

Perhaps the key defining feature of the general election was that almost nothing happened as we had expected. Even in Scotland, where the result was broadly what had been predicted by the polls (though as Andrew Marr wrote, ‘anybody who stepped off the train at Edinburgh Waverley Station and bought a latte would have picked that up’), the consequences were different. The SNP thought that they were going to hold the balance of power at Westminster. They were going to lock out David Cameron and the Conservatives, and demand constant concessions Ed Miliband. Instead, they’ve found themselves on the wrong side of a small, but workable, Conservative majority. Ahead there are five years of heckling the steamroller. Continue reading