Why do we care what our politicians get paid?

Why do we care what our politicians get paid?

Since payments for MPs were introduced early in the 20th century, the rhetoric used to justify them has changed markedly. Initially, writes Nicholas Dickinson, on a blog originally posted by Democratic Audit, any remuneration was almost always construed in terms of broadening democratic representation. Related to a landmark 1971 report, however, MPs increasingly began to be depicted as political professionals. This change in framing allowed salaries to increase, but at the cost of lasting public ambivalence.

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The pastoral role of the party whips

The pastoral role of the party whips

Party whips are well-known for their role as enforcers in the Westminster Parliament, but in a new blog Andrew Defty, University of Lincoln, discusses a less well-known part of their role: offering pastoral care to MPs.

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Dealignment and the Power of Parliamentary Committees

Dealignment and the Power of Parliamentary Committees

The power of parliamentary committees varies greatly, both between countries and over time. Thomas Fleming analyses committees in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, and the UK to argue that committee power is influenced by voters’ attachments to political parties.

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How effective are the Commons’ two committee systems at scrutinising government policy-making?

How effective are the Commons’ two committee systems at scrutinising government policy-making?

In addition to their floor debates, a crucial role of legislatures is to scrutinise government law-making and policy implementation. The House of Commons looks at legislation via bill committees, and its select committees cover each of the Whitehall departments to scrutinise implementation. As part of the 2018 Audit of UK Democracy, Patrick Dunleavy and the Democratic Audit team consider how well current processes maintain parliamentary knowledge and scrutiny of the central state in the UK and England.

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